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why hysterectomy

Is a hysterectomy always the best option?

When women are diagnosed with a uterine prolapse, they are often advised that a hysterectomy is the only viable treatment option for them. Unfortunately, this can lead to many women undergoing surgery unnecessarily. Whilst a hysterectomy can provide relief from prolapse symptoms, there are other, less invasive, uterine prolapse treatments available.

Although many women are willing to undergo surgery for prolapse problems, a hysterectomy has permanent consequences and will prevent the patient from carrying children in the future. Due to this, many women of childbearing age are unwilling to commit to this type of treatment. As they aren’t always advised of the alternative prolapse treatments which are available, they can be left dealing with severe prolapse symptoms.

In addition to this, a hysterectomy can require a lengthy period of recovery. Whilst the operation is considered to be fairly routine in many cases, patients may find that it takes weeks or months for them to fully recover from the invasive procedure. By exploring other options and different forms of prolapse surgery, women can find far less invasive treatment methods at The Pelvic Clinic.

Can a sacrohysteropexy alleviate prolapse symptoms?

Designed to support the uterus, a sacrohysteropexy can be used to alleviate prolapse symptoms permanently. During the procedure, surgical mesh is placed under the uterus in order to prevent it from placing unnecessary pressure on the surrounding muscles and tissues. As a result, prolapse symptoms are relieved and patients no longer suffer from the painful and embarrassing issues associated with the condition. Mr Broome enters the mesh abdominally which is a cleaner method than through the vagina.

Whilst many women experience a prolapsed uterus after childbirth, they may still want to have additional children in the future. Unlike a hysterectomy, a sacrohysteropexy needn’t prevent patients from conceiving or carrying children.

With many women struggling to cope with uterus pain and discomfort caused by a prolapse, a sacrohysteropexy offers an effective, permanent and minimally invasive solution.

Having performed over 1,000 procedures, with a success rate of 100%, Mr Jonathan Broome, Consultant Gynaecologist, is well-equipped to carry out the sacrohysteropexy procedure on patients. By using uterine prolapse staging to determine the severity of the condition, an appropriate treatment plan can be put in place quickly and efficiently.

Recovering from prolapse surgery

Uterine prolapse is a condition that can occur in women after a particularly difficult vaginal delivery of a child. The pelvic floor muscles lose their ability to support the uterus properly, and it slips down; this impairs sexual functions and can cause bleeding, constipation and other symptoms. Often, prolapse surgery is the only way to treat the condition.

An alternative to hysterectomy, sacrohysteropexy is a surgery that mitigates uterine prolapse by resuspending the uterus using a synthetic mesh to lift it back into place, and Mr Jonathan Broome, our Consultant Gynaecologist, is one of the UK’s leading surgeons in this procedure. The corrective procedure comes in the form of open surgery or the less-invasive laparoscopic surgery using keyhole incisions. Mr Broomes method of inserting mesh is done through the abdomen which is a cleaner way than inserting it vaginally.

Whether you have a hysterectomy or sacrohysteropexy, some people tend to fear surgery not only because of the risks involved but because of its effect on daily life. Of course, any operation takes time to heal, but there are ways to help your recovery along.

First of all, nutrition is vital. While you are still in the hospital, they will recommend a specific diet, often liquid, that will help you to get better. Even though you might not be hungry, remember that your body needs the nutrients to heal. Sipping something sour or tangy like teas and bitters helps improve the appetite. Find something that suits your taste to get you in the mood for the essential act of eating.

Secondly, look after your immune system. Some drugs administered around surgery like antibiotics and general anaesthesia can lower your t-cell count. Be sure to have a proper intake of vitamins to keep your immune system healthy to defend your body against infections that will only extend your period of recovery. This is something you can do in the weeks and months prior to surgery by engaging in a healthy diet.

Finally, remember to exercise your body but not to strain yourself. Exercise helps blood flow and boosts your metabolism. It can be something as simple as taking a walk once in a while or stretching your legs and arms. Just to be careful; ask your physician when considering what form of exercise you want to undertake to avoid injuring yourself.

Most of all, exercise a measure of patience. The body needs time to heal and you will be happier if you let it do it properly. If you’d like to discuss the options for prolapse surgery available to you, contact us at The Pelvic Clinic today.